1. Introduction to stains: types, causes and risk factors

Glowing Skin - Geneva - Face care - Spots 1

Spots on the skin can be harmless or a sign of a more serious problem. They can appear in different shapes, colors and sizes and on any part of the body, including the face, hands, arms, legs, back and neck. In this article, we'll explore the different types of spots, their possible causes, and the associated risk factors.

Types of stains

Spots on the skin can be classified based on their color and shape. According to a study conducted by the American Academy of Dermatology, the most common types of spots are:

Brown spots: Also called age spots, these spots are usually brown or black and appear on sun-exposed areas, such as the face, hands and arms. According to the same study, nearly 90% of people over 60 have age spots.

Red spots: these spots can be red or pinkish and can be caused by factors such as eczema, psoriasis, rosacea or couperose. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, approximately 16 million Americans suffer from rosacea.

White spots: also called vitiligo, these spots are characterized by loss of skin pigmentation and can appear on any part of the body. According to the World Health Organization, about 1% of the world's population has vitiligo.

Birthmarks: These marks are present from birth and can be of different sizes, colors and shapes. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, about 1 in 10 births have a birthmark.

Freckles: These spots are usually light brown in color and appear on areas exposed to the sun, such as the face, arms and shoulders. According to a study published in the journal Nature, people with fair skin are more likely to develop freckles.

Spots caused by acne: These spots can be red, brown or black and are often caused by inflammation of the skin due to acne. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, approximately 50 million Americans are affected by acne each year.

Causes of spots

Spots on the skin can be caused by a variety of factors, including:

Sun exposure: Prolonged sun exposure can lead to dark spots and freckles. According to a study conducted by the American Academy of Dermatology, approximately 90% of skin changes associated with aging are caused by sun exposure.

Aging: Skin can lose its elasticity and firmness with age, which can lead to the appearance of age spots and other age-related spots.

Hormonal changes: Pregnancy spotting and spotting from taking birth control pills are caused by hormonal changes in the body.

Wounds and scars: scars can leave dark spots on the skin, while wounds can cause post-inflammatory pigmentation spots.

Skin diseases: Skin diseases such as eczema, psoriasis, rosacea and rosacea can cause red spots on the skin.

Pigment disorders: Vitiligo is a pigment disorder that can cause white spots on the skin.

Risk factors

Certain factors can increase the risk of developing spots on the skin, including:

Sun exposure: Prolonged sun exposure is a major risk factor for age spots, freckles, and other types of sun spots.

Age: Aging skin is a risk factor for age spots and other age-related spots.

Hormonal changes: Pregnant women and those taking birth control pills are more likely to develop birthmarks and other spots caused by hormonal changes.

Family history: Some spots can be hereditary, meaning if someone in your family has spots, you're more likely to have them too.

Skin diseases: people with a skin disease have an increased risk of developing spots.

Conclusion

Spots on the skin can be harmless or a sign of a more serious problem. It is important to know the different types of spots, their possible causes and the associated risk factors. By taking care of your skin and avoiding risk factors, you can reduce your risk of developing spots and maintain healthy, radiant skin.